Thursday, February 27, 2014

Voices of Alabama

Does anyone remember this blog I wrote a little less than a year ago?
If you didn't read it, I will sum it up. We were chosen last year to represent "current farm families in Alabama" in a new exhibit at the Alabama Department of Archives opening in Spring 2014. A couple of weeks ago, we attended the Grand Opening!
 
 Governor Robert Bentley and other dignitaries spoke and had a ribbon cutting ceremony, then we got to tour the new exhibit!
 There is so much to look at here! It would take hours and hours to read every piece of information. Tons of artifacts from Alabama's history.
 A major part of Alabama's history was cotton!
 There were so many facts, information, and artifacts dealing with the cotton industry.
 Indians, slavery, and the Civil War were also major parts of the museum.
 We found this cannon ball display quite interesting. See that solid, small cannon ball in the middle? Lance found one just like it in one of our fields a few years ago. It is called a 12 pound solid shot.
 There was also a huge replica of a town in the 1800s. This town was so tiny, but it had every little detail down to corn growing in someone's garden to laundry hanging on a clothesline.
 Here's some of the military display.
A model of a rocket from the Huntsville Space and Rocket Center and Hank William's suit and guitar. 
 And of course, displays on Alabama and Auburn football and racing at Talladega Superspeedway.
 Throughout the museum, there were quotes on the walls. I've added pictures of some of my favorites.
 This one turned out a little blurry, so I hope you can read it!
 A very famous quote.
This one is definitely the best.
The last section of the museum was called "Inheriting Alabama."

It features current Alabamians doing things we do in Alabama!

 Recognize anyone in these pictures?
Tada! There we are! We are so excited we were picked to be a part of "Alabama History!"
 
If you would like more information on the Museum of Alabama at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Please visit their website!


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